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  Home > Current Clinical Trials
 

Current Clinical Trials

Dr._Henson_with_dog

 
We have many opportunities for pet animals to participate in clinical trials. Each listing below has a quick summary plus a link to more information for each study.

Clinical Trials Seeking Participants:

Studies for Dogs  

Studies for Cats  

More questions? See:

Frequently Asked Questions

 


Clinical Trials Seeking Participants

 
Studies for Dogs

CategoryWhich animals is the study for?
Description of study and link to more information
Cancer
(Oncology)
Dogs with hemangiosarcoma (HSA)Dogs diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma (of the spleen) and no evidence of metastasis for study of experimental treatment added to chemotherapy. See SRCBST study.

Brain tumor trialsDogs with solitary brain tumors with MRI diagnosis of meningioma for a twelve month trial at the Veterinary Medical Center.  Go to Canine Brain Tumor Clinical Trials.
 Animal Cancer Care and ResearchRead about the ACCR
 
Emergency/
Critical Care
Dogs in the ER or ICU which are in shockStudy to compare standard of care clinician directed therapy to goal directed therapy including tissue oxygen levels in canine patients with evidence of shock. More...
Internal MedicineWest Highland White TerriersStudy to determine the genetic basis of pulmonary fibrosis (PF) in dogs, seeking West Highland White Terriers with PF and those >8 yrs old without PF. More...
 

Min. Schnauzers, Bichons, Yorkshire Terriers, Min. Poodles, Shih Tzus

Study to determine the genetic basis of calcium oxalate stones in high-risk breeds.  More...
Orthopedics/ SurgeryDogs with arthritis in a joint90-day study of an oral nutraceutical vs Dasuquin vs placebo. More...
 Dogs with arthritis in one or more jointsStem cell therapy given with 12-weeks of follow-up. More...
 Dogs having TPLO surgery on one knee
 
Post-operative pain study of gabapentin vs standard of care. More...
Preventative MedicineHealthy dogs that have not received a kennel cough vaccine within the last six monthsDetermine​ whether vaccinating a dog with kennel cough will cause ​the dog to have a ​false​ly​ positive response ​on blood samples tested with therapid slide agglutination test. More...
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Studies for Cats 
 

 None at this time, please check back!

 
   

 

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Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is a clinical trial (also called clinical study)?
  2. How do I get my pet into a clinical trial?
  3. How do I know that clinical trials are safe?
  4. What if I don't see a clinical trial that is for my pet's disease or condition? Is there other research that my pet can participate in?
  5. What are the hours for appointments?
  6. Will my pet need to stay at the hospital for the duration of the study?
  7. How often will I need to bring my pet?
  8. How long do your clinical trials last?
  9. Can I participate in the clinical trial at my regular vet's office?
  10. If I agree to participate in the study, am I obligated to keep my pet enrolled, even if I feel it is not in her/his best interest any longer?

What is a clinical trial (also called clinical study)?
A clinical trial is research which tries to answer specific questions about medications, vaccines, or new therapies. Clinical trials (also called medical research and research studies) are used to determine whether new drugs or treatments are both safe and effective. Carefully conducted clinical trials are the fastest and safest way to find treatments that work.

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How do I get my pet into a clinical trial?
Above you can see a list of the clinical trials that are currently enrolling participants. If you think your pet qualifies, please contact the person listed or you may contact us at the CIC.

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How do I know that clinical trials are safe?
There is some risk with any clinical trial, just as there is with many medical procedures.  However, all clinical trials have been reviewed by an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) before they can begin.  Informed owner consent is always a part of the study, which means that you are given all the information up front and must agree in writing before your pet can enter the study. To learn more about our IACUC process, see their website.

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What if I don't see a clinical trial that is for my pet's disease or condition?  Is there other research that my pet can participate in?
Clinical trials are for a specific purpose.  If there is not something currently underway for which your pet qualifies, you may want to check back.  New studies start frequently.  If you are interested in having your pet seen at the Veterinary Medical Center, please contact the hospital directly, at 612-626-VETS (8387).

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What are the hours for appointments?
We typically schedule appointments between 8:00 am and 3:00 pm. However, the VMC is a 24 hour hospital and owners are welcome to drop off/pick up their pets at any time of day. Some of our clients drop off on their way to work and pick up at their convenience on their way home. Please keep in mind however, that some visits require the owner to present at the appointment.

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Will my pet need to stay at the hospital for the duration of the study?
There might be an initial need to stay at the hospital, for a surgical study for example. Most of the visits are outpatient and are an hour or less. This varies by study, so please ask the contact person if you have a clinical trial in mind.

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How often will I need to bring in my pet?
How often we need to see your pet varies by clinical trial. Often a study requires an initial appointment, then recheck appointments every 2 weeks or every month. Some studies have a more frequent schedule in the beginning, such as every other day, but even these usually spread out after that. Please ask the contact person if you have a specific clinical trial in mind.

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How long do your clinical trials last?
This varies by study, some last a month, some go for a year (with infrequent visits). Please contact us for more information.

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Can I participate in the clinical trial at my regular vet's office?
Generally, no. This is because in order to get the most out of the research being conducted, it is critical that the study be performed in the same way for each patient, and that all the essential information is recorded by trained personnel. Most of our clinical trials require visits to the VMC to be seen by the veterinarians participating in the research and our trained staff. We are also bound by confidentiality with our sponsors to not release information beyond the University. Finally, some of the experimental treatments and drugs cannot be shipped or released to other sites due to safety or regulations prohibiting it.

That said, some clinical trials do seek help from other veterinarians in the area, or allow for portions of the study to be performed at your regular vet. If this is the case, we will be happy to discuss it with you.

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If I agree to participate in the study, am I obligated to keep my pet enrolled, even if I feel it is not in her/his best interest any longer?
We gain a great deal of information from the animals that participate in our clinical trials. However, if you feel that the study is negatively impacting your pet, or you would like to discontinue the study for any reason, you are free to do so. Withdrawing from a clinical trial will not negatively impact the owner's relationship with the VMC or the CIC.

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