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  Home > Current Clinical Trials > Small Animal Surgery
 

Small Animal Surgery

CVMVMC2 - image - 690x350 - lake dog

Welcome to the Small Animal Surgery Studies Page!

If you would like more information about a study, or think you would like to enroll your pet, contact the person listed under the study. You may also Contact Us at the CIC.

Currently open studies:
1. Evaluation of Allogeneic Stem Cells as an Adjuvant Therapy for Osteoarthritis
2. TCMR0002 Study (investigational drugs for dogs with osteoarthritis)
3. Hydrocodone in the management of perioperative pain following TPLO surgery in dogs


Evaluation of Allogeneic Stem Cells as an Adjuvant Therapy for Osteoarthritis

Current Status: Open and enrolling
Investigators:
Michael Conzemius, DVM, PhD, DACVS
Kristina Kiefer, DVM, PhD
Contact: Sara Pracht, study technician, at 612-626-3574, prach011@umn.edu

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a non-reversible disease in which the joint loses cartilage and begins to ossify (become bone-like). This causes pain and therefore lameness. Current therapies involve weight control, pain management and physical therapy. Allogeneic stem cell therapy is currently being explored as a possible treatment for this disease. This involves collection of stem cells from fat in normal dogs undergoing routine surgeries (such as spay or neuter). Because the cells come from a dog other than your pet, they are called allogeneic (non-self). These cells are capable of becoming many kinds of cells, and reduce inflammation. In theory, these stem cells can differentiate into cartilage. We suspect that allogeneic stem cell therapy will decrease inflammation of joints affected by OA and slow down arthritic progression.

We are looking for adult dogs that have been diagnosed with OA through physical examination, blood work and radiographs (x-rays). There are two paths or arms in the study:

  1. If one limb is most clinically affected, dogs will be assigned to either a treatment group or a control group. This arm of the study uses injections into the affected joint under mild sedation. Dogs also receive gait analysis at each visit, where they will be leash-walked over a force plate to assess the severity of the lameness. 
    • The treatment group will be treated with an allogeneic stem cell injection into the joint (IA) at enrollment and again at 6 weeks. No sedation is required for this injection. There is a final visit at 12 weeks.
    • The control group will receive a placebo (saline) injection IA at enrollment and at 6 weeks. At the final 12 week visit, if the dog had the placebo injections, the dog will have the opportunity to receive allogeneic stem cell therapy if the owner wishes.
       
  2. If multiple limbs are affected, dogs will be assigned to a treatment group or a control group. This arm of the study uses intravenous stem (IV) cell injections and an activity monitor which the dog wears to determine activity levels.
    • The treatment group will be treated with allogeneic stem cells (IV) at enrollment and again at 6 weeks. No sedation is required for this injection. There is a final visit at 12 weeks.
    • The control group will reeive a placebo (saline) injection IV at enrollment and at 6 weeks. At the final 12 week visit, if the dog had the placebo injections, the dog will have the opportunity to receive allogeneic stem cell therapy if the owner wishes.
       

For more information, please contact Sara Pracht above.

TCMR0002 Study (investigational drugs for dogs with osteoarthritis)
 

Current Status: Open and enrolling
Investigator: Michael Conzemius, DVM, PhD, DACVS
Contact: Sara Pracht, study technician, at 612-626-3574, prach011@umn.edu

Purpose of study:
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive, degenerative disease of the joints. OA is a common condition in dogs with signs that develop slowly. Dogs with OA pain may become less active during play, walks, when going up or down stairs, or jumping. Current treatments are not without side effects, therefore study of additional medications for the pain of OA are needed.

The primary purpose of this study is to test two investigational medications to determine if either one, or both, work to potentially decrease signs of pain of osteoarthritis in dogs. As a result of this study, the veterinary medical researchers and scientists hope to learn more about osteoarthritis, and how these medicines might work to help osteoarthritis. The medicines being tested could be further developed for either animals or humans.

Dogs needed:

  • 2 years old or more
  • Weigh between 33 and 110 pounds
  • Otherwise good health
  • Not on certain medications - call for details

Description of study:

  • Four randomly assigned groups: one with each investigational drug, one with Rimadyl and one with placebo
  • Visits: Visits 1 and 2 for screening diagnostic tests (exam, lameness evaluation, X-rays, ECG, blood and urine sampling), Visit 2 becomes dosing visit if dog qualifies, Visit 3 at two weeks following, Visit 4 two weeks after Visit 3
  • All study drugs given orally in clinic on visit days, and at home by owner (twice daily dosing)

The study covers costs of study visits, screening diagnostics, study medications and study-related tests. Owners who complete the study are eligible for a Visa gift card up to $150.

For questions and to schedule an appointment, please contact Sara Pracht (see above).

Hydrocodone in the management of perioperative pain following TPLO surgery in dogs

Current Status: Open and enrolling
Investigators:
Michael Conzemius, DVM, PhD, DACVS
Ann Heffernan, DVM
Contact: Dr. Heffernan at heff0050@umn.edu or Andrea Eckert, study technician, at 612-625-3157, aleckert@umn.edu

Managing pain after surgery continues to be of increasing importance in veterinary medicine. Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS) are FDA approved for pain relief before, during, and after surgery, but many dogs have contraindications (reasons to not use) to NSAIDS so oral alternatives are still needed.

Hydrocodone is in a class of drugs called opioids and is a commonly used analgesic and cough-suppressant in humans. This study will compare hydrocodone to an NSAID (Previcox) with the hypothesis that it will provide the same pain relief effect in dogs after TPLO surgery. This will be a randomized, blinded study in client-owned dogs. Patient pain will be measured using pressure platform limb function analysis and a subjective cumulative pain score.

Dogs needed:

  • Healthy adult dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in one leg planning on TPLO (Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy) surgery at the Veterinary Medical Center
  • Weigh > 25 kg (55 lbs)
  • Diagnosis confirmed by x-ray, normal blood tests
  • Certain pain medications not allowed for 3-7 days prior to study - call for details
  • Not pregnant, not aggressive, no bleeding disorders, no neurological impairments

All dogs enrolled in the study will have a unlitateral TPLO plus meniscus inspection (no arthroscopy) by caudomedial or craniolateral arthrotomy at the VMC. Each patient will be randomized into one of two groups: hydrocodone or standard of care (Previcox). Pain levels will be monitored prior to surgery, the day of surgery and for three days post-op using a pressure platform stance analysis and a standardized pain scale. The client will be responsible for the cost of the TPLO surgery. The study pays for the additional days of hospitalization and post-op pain medications.

Owners willing to participate will receive a $300 credit at the Veterinary Medical Center as compensation for participating.

For more information, please contact Dr. Heffernan or Andrea Eckert, listed above.

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