CIC
What's Inside


College Links

 About

 Directory

 Employment

 Map/Directions

 Volunteer

Search

 

 

Make a Gift box


 

 
  Home > Current Clinical Trials > Small Animal Surgery
 

Small Animal Surgery

CVMVMC2 - image - 690x350 - lake dog

Welcome to the Small Animal Surgery Studies Page!

If you would like more information about a study, or think you would like to enroll your pet, contact the person listed under the study. You may also Contact Us at the CIC.

Currently open studies:
1. Evaluation of Allogeneic Stem Cells as an Adjuvant Therapy for Osteoarthritis


Evaluation of Allogeneic Stem Cells as an Adjuvant Therapy for Osteoarthritis

Current Status: Open and enrolling
Investigators:
Michael Conzemius, DVM, PhD, DACVS
Kristina Kiefer, DVM, PhD
Contact: Sara Pracht, study technician, at 612-626-3574, prach011@umn.edu

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a non-reversible disease in which the joint loses cartilage and begins to ossify (become bone-like). This causes pain and therefore lameness. Current therapies involve weight control, pain management and physical therapy. Allogeneic stem cell therapy is currently being explored as a possible treatment for this disease. This involves collection of stem cells from fat in normal dogs undergoing routine surgeries (such as spay or neuter). Because the cells come from a dog other than your pet, they are called allogeneic (non-self). These cells are capable of becoming many kinds of cells, and reduce inflammation. In theory, these stem cells can differentiate into cartilage. We suspect that allogeneic stem cell therapy will decrease inflammation of joints affected by OA and slow down arthritic progression.

We are looking for adult dogs that have been diagnosed with OA through physical examination, blood work, urinalysis, and radiographs (x-rays). There are two paths or arms in the study:

  1. If one limb is most clinically affected, dogs will be assigned to either a treatment group or a control group. This arm of the study uses injections into the affected joint under mild sedation. Dogs also receive gait analysis at each visit, where they will be leash-walked over a force plate to assess the severity of the lameness. At the 12 week visit, dogs will recieve radiographs to determine the severity of OA.
    • The treatment group will be treated with an allogeneic stem cell injection into the joint (IA) at enrollment and again at 6 weeks. No sedation is required for this injection. There is a final visit at 12 weeks.
    • The control group will recieve a placebo (saline) injection IA at enrollment and at 6 weeks. At the final 12 week visit, if the dog had the placebo injections, the dog will have the oppportunity to receive allogeneic stem cell therapy if the owner wishes.
       
  2. If multiple limbs are affected, dogs will be assigned to a treatment group or a control group. This arm of the study uses intravenous stem (IV) cell injections and an activity monitor which the dog wears to determine activity levels. At the 12 week visit, dogs will recieve radiographs to determine the severity of OA.
    • The treatment group will be treated with allogeneic stem cells (IV) at enrollment and again at 6 weeks. No sedation is required for this injection. There is a final visit at 12 weeks.
    • The control group will recieve a placebo (saline) injection IV at enrollment and at 6 weeks. At the final 12 week visit, if the dog had the placebo injections, the dog will have the oppportunity to receive allogeneic stem cell therapy if the owner wishes.
       

For more information, please contact Sara Pracht above.

Return to top

  

 

 

Notice of Privacy Practices